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Financial Library

A State of Financial Wellness

Money has long been the number one stressor for many Canadians, and there's no doubt that COVID has magnified this reality. It has upended jobs, security, health and financial stability for people across the country. Millions of Canadians are struggling to cover their bills. In March of 2020, 49% of Canadians were just $200 from financial insolvency1.

Simple Strategies To Save On Your Mortgage

Buying a house is usually the most significant investment decision anyone ever makes. Owning a house also tends to have an outsized impact on a person's overall financial strategy during their lifetime. Buying wisely and choosing the right debt strategy can get you mortgage-free faster. By just following a few simple strategies, you could live in the home of your dreams, shave years off your amortization and save tens of thousands of dollars in interest.

Moving For a New Job? Consider the Costs

A job change is no longer just about higher pay or a better title. It can also be about achieving a healthier life balance or simply trying something new. In many cases, a new job includes relocating to a new community. A new opportunity can be very exciting, but even the most positive change comes with financial implications, especially when a move is involved. It’s good to understand the unexpected costs around relocating. A little knowledge can help you capitalize on the momentum of your new role without compromising your overall financial plan.

When Volatility Arrives, Optimism is Key!

The focus here is on you as an investor! What do you bring to the table in terms of investment experience and personal temperament (emotions) that impacts your investment returns and satisfaction while building your nest egg?

Put Your Eggs In Many Baskets

When their investment savings plummeted in the 2001 stock market crash, Adam and Sonya were concerned, but not panicked. Retirement was a long way out, so they had plenty of time to recover. The couple decided to try their hand at 'timing the market' (buying and selling stocks based on expected market fluctuations) to recover their losses. "We thought that if we stayed on top things and could chart when the market would go up and down, we could make our money back," says Adam.

Leaving a Legacy

Recently retired Ross and Penny have an estate planning challenge. They've accumulated a comfortable net worth, with a good portion of it in liquid investments. They plan to leave everything to their three adult children, but they also want to help them financially right now. The problem is that all of their children have a different relationship with money than Ross and Penny. In a nutshell, the parents are savers and the children spenders. If they give large sums of money, Ross and Penny would want their children to use the cash to improve their financial lives. Would they do that?

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